Standing and Cross-Appointed Faculty


Standing Faculty

The WGS program has several “in-house” staff and employees, including two tenure-track professors, a senior lecturer, a program administrator and a full-time director, usually “borrowed” from another department for a period of 3-5 years. Along with the graduate director and undergraduate director (when the people in these positions are not already “in-house”), these WGS people make up the administrative team, and meet once or twice a month to deal with administrative decisions.


cervenakSarah Jane Cervenak

Director of Undergraduate Studies
Assistant Professor

Women's and Gender Studies/African American Studies

sjcerven@uncg.edu
336.334.4494
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Ph.D New York University

Sarah Jane Cervenak is an assistant professor, jointly appointed in the Women’s and Gender Studies and African American Studies programs at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro. Her areas of research and teaching are critical race theory, feminist theory, Black studies, performance studies and philosophy. Her current work queries the Black radical, feminist potential of gathering in the art of Leonardo Drew, Gayl Jones and Wangechi Mutu. She is the author of Wandering: Philosophical Performances of Racial and Sexual Freedom (Duke University Press, September 2014). She has also published in the academic journals Discourse, Palimpsest: Women, Gender and the Black International, and Spectator as well as in anthologies on feminism and the African American novel respectively.

Bouchard-Danielle Bouchard

Past Director of Undergraduate Studies
Associate Professor

Women's and Gender Studies

dmboucha@uncg.edu
336.334.4344
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Ph.D University of Minnesota

Danielle Bouchard earned her Ph.D. in Feminist Studies from the University of Minnesota in 2006. Her scholarly interests include postcolonial and poststructuralist feminisms, contemporary continental philosophy, critical university studies, and cinema and visual media studies. Her first book, A Community of Disagreement: Feminism in the University (Peter Lang 2012), uses the philosophical concept of disagreement to read, and provide alternatives to, the most common ways in which feminism's place in the modern US university is imagined. She is currently working on a new book project that examines the role of visual tropes, texts, and technologies in hegemonic articulations of human rights.

Dr. Bouchard's accomplishments were featured on our website! Read More >>

photoMichelle Powell

Lecturer
Women's and Gender Studies

mapowell@uncg.edu
336.334.4443

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Ph.D University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Michelle Powell earned her Ph.D in Educational Studies with a Certificate in Women’s and Gender Studies. She comes to UNCG from Indiana University-Bloomington, where she was a visiting faculty member in the department of Gender Studies. Michelle’s scholarship utilizes the insights of feminist, queer, and postcolonial thought to offer alternative political strategies to traditional multicultural liberatory discourses. Her current book project, Deconstructing Liberated Subjects offers a critique of the centrality of “voice” in contemporary political projects aimed at liberating or empowering oppressed groups. Michelle enjoys introducing students to the breadth of traditions that inform Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, and mentoring students in developing their own research and activist projects. Her courses cover a wide range of themes and topics, from the politics of public restrooms to poststructuralist theories of subjectivity.


Cross Appointed Faculty

Cross-appointed faculty are those with an interest in issues of women, gender, sexuality and related topics, who have officially joined the WGS program through an individualized MOU between their department chair and the WGS director.  These program faculty are empowered to make decisions, particularly in votes on promotion and tenure, and usually serve on WGS committees, teach WGS classes and classes that carry the WGS marker.  Their appointment term is four years. If you are interested in becoming a cross-appointed faculty member, please e-mail the current director and program administrator, or wgs@uncg.edu.


 

Risa-ApplegarthRisa Applegarth (Appointed until Spring 2021)

Associate Professor
Department of English

risa_applegarth@uncg.edu
336.334.3967
Webpage
CV
Ph.D University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Risa Applegarth received her Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and joined the UNCG Department of English in 2009. She teaches and conducts research in genre theory, feminist theory, and women's rhetorics, as well as autobiography, nature writing, and science studies. Her dissertation on the rhetorical practices of early women anthropologists won her field's 2010 James Berlin Memorial Outstanding Dissertation Award, and her publications include articles in Rhetoric Society Quarterly and CCC. Her first book, Other Grounds: Gender, Genre, and Science in American Anthropology, is forthcoming from the University of Pittsburgh Press. Her current projects include a study of agency and materiality in debates surrounding the 1995 Children's Peace Statue, and a book-length study of public activism and rhetorical training in Business and Professional Women's Clubs in the 1920s and 1930s.

silvia-bettezSilvia Bettez (Appointed until Spring 2021)

Associate Professor
Department of Education Leadership and Cultural Foundations

scbettez@uncg.edu
336.256.0516
Bettez-CV
Ph.D University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Graduate Certificate in Women’s Studies from Duke University

Silvia Bettez teaches about issues of social justice in a graduate program including classes such as Teaching Social Justice, Educational Sociology, Passionate Pedagogies, and Culturally Responsive Leadership. Her scholarship centralizes social justice with a focus on fostering critical community building, teaching for social justice, and promoting equity through intercultural communication and engagement. She has published articles in Educational Studies, Equity and Excellence in Education, Educational Foundations, and The Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies. In 2012, she published a book titled But Don't Call Me White: Mixed Race Women Exposing Nuances of Privilege and Oppression Politics (Sense Publishers).

SI ExifBen Clarke (Appointed until Spring 2021)

Associate Professor
Department of English

b_clarke@uncg.edu
Webpage
336.334.3967
Ph.D University of Oxford

Ben Clarke specializes in British literature after 1900 and critical theory. He has particular interests in the literature of the nineteen-thirties, working-class writing and cultural studies. He is the author of Orwell in Context: Communities, Myths, Values (Palgrave, 2007), and co-author, with Michael Bailey and John K. Walton, of Understanding Richard Hoggart (Blackwell, 2012). He has published on authors including Edward Upward, Virginia Woolf, and H. G. Wells, and on subjects such as public houses, Englishness, the representation of mining communities, the idea of the public intellectual, and Western anthropological accounts of Taiwan. Ben is currently co-writing a new study of Richard Hoggart with Sue Owen and researching a monograph on political and aesthetic experimentation in interwar British literature. He is also working on a series of articles on working-class literature and culture. He has a particular interest in working-class masculinities and the ways in which these are used in political movements and discourses.

unnamedJenny Dale (Appointed until Spring 2020)

Reference Librarian and First Year Instruction Coordinator
UNC-Greensboro University Libraries

jedale2@uncg.edu
336.256.0240
MA University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill


Jenny Dale has an MS in Library Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. As the Coordinator of First-Year Programs at UNCG University Libraries, she teaches research workshops for first-year courses and works with campus partners to integrate information literacy into the first-year experience. She is the liaison to Women's and Gender Studies as well as Communication Studies, English, and Media Studies. Her current research is focused on pedagogy - including critical and feminist pedagogy - for teaching librarians.

emilyEmily Edwards (Appointed through Spring 2020)

Professor
Department of Media Studies

ededward@uncg.edu
Webpage
336.334.4135
Ph.D University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Emily D. Edwards received her Ph.D. in Journalism and Mass Communication and Master of Arts in Drama from the University of Tennessee Knoxville. She worked professionally as a news reporter, producer, copywriter for NBC and ABC affiliates. The writer, producer, director of more than twenty films, Edwards is also published in the areas of gender and media culture, popular music, the occult in film, and documentary filmmaking. Her feature films include Bone Creek (2009), Scripture Cake (2007), and Root Doctor (2005). She is also known for Deadheads: An American Subculture (Films for the Humanities and Sciences, 1990); Wondrous Events (1995), and Wondrous Healing (2005). Edwards’ screenplays have received awards from: the Broadcast Education Association (BEA), University Film and Video Association (UFVA), Twin Rivers, and Bare Bone International screenwriting competitions among others. She has been a Nicholl Semifinalist. Her films have received awards from CINE, Moondance, UFVA, The George Lindsey Film Festival, Accolade, BEA, Indie Memphis, Pixal Academy, and Boomtown Film and Music Festival (among others) and have been exhibited at festivals and in television broadcast nationwide. She is currently the Director for the Center for Creative Writing in the Arts at UNCG.

Feather-JennJennifer Feather (Appointed through Spring 2020)

Associate Professor
Department of English

jennifer_feather@uncg.edu
336.334.5221
Webpage
CV
Ph.D Brown University

Jennifer Feather is an assistant professor of English literature at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, specializing in early Renaissance literature with an additional interest in contemporary theories of gender and violence. Her book “Writing Combat and the Self in Early Modern English Literature: The Pen and the Sword” (Palgrave 2011) examines competing depictions of combat in sixteenth-century texts as varied as Arthurian romance and early modern medical texts to demonstrate the continued importance of combat in understanding the humanist subject and the contours of the previously neglected pre-modern subject. In addition, she has published essays on blood in Shakespeare’s Othello (forthcoming in Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England) and the importance of Brutus’s suicide in Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar (in Shakespeare and Moral Agency, ed. Michael D. Bristol. New York, NY: Continuum Books, 2010).

Gabbay-AlyssaAlyssa Gabbay (Appointed until Fall 2017)

Assistant Professor
Department of Religious Studies

agabbay@uncg.edu
Webpage
Ph.D University of Chicago

Alyssa Gabbay received her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago with a specialization in Persian literature and medieval Islamic history. Her research interests include the status of women in Islam, Sufism in the medieval Persianate world, and religious pluralism and Islam. At UNCG, she teaches Introduction to Islam; Approaches to the Qur’an; Women, Autobiography, and Islam; and Islam’s Mystical Tradition. Her book, Islamic Tolerance: Amir Khusraw and Pluralism, was published by Routledge in 2010. She is currently working on two separate projects: The New Moon of Perfection and Other Prefaces (under advance contract with Murty Classical Library of India, Harvard University Press) and a monograph on bilateral descent in medieval Islam.

tara-greenTara Green
(Appointed until Spring 2020)

Professor
African American and African Diaspora Studies

ttgreen@uncg.edu
Webpage
336.334.5507
Ph.D Louisiana State University

She is a Professor and Director of African American Studies at UNCG. Her areas of research include, Black gender studies, African American autobiographies and fiction, African American experiences in the South, and the African diaspora in the U.S.
ghunnicuttGwen Hunnicutt (Appointed through Spring 2020)

Associate Professor
Department of Sociology

gchunnic@uncg.edu
Webpage
336.256.3698
Ph.D University of New Mexico

Gwen Hunnicutt is an Associate Professor of Sociology and Women's and Gender Studies at the University of North Carolina Greensboro. Gwen received her PhD in Sociology from the University of New Mexico. Professor Hunnicutt studies various dimensions of gender violence. The gender violence topics she has addressed in her past and current research and scholarship include: intimate partner violence among self-identified queer victims; theory development on gender-based violence; the relationships between masculinity, empathy and aggression; explorations in the intersection of ecology, feminism and gender violence; the sociological implications of traumatic brain injury among battered women; gender violence, the state and political projects. She teaches the Sociology Gender; Gender, Crime and Deviance; and Collective Violence and Non-violence in Global Perspective. Professor Hunnicutt is also the former Director of Graduate Studies for the WGS program (2010-2013).

keathley-elizabethElizabeth L. Keathley (Appointed through Spring 2020)

Director of Graduate Studies
Associate Professor

School of Music

elkeathl@uncg.edu
Webpage
336.334.5911
CV
Ph.D SUNY Stony Brook

Elizabeth L. Keathley, Associate Professor of Historical Musicology and Women's and Gender Studies, is a native of California and earned her MA and PhD in Music, as well as an Advanced Certificate in Women's Studies, from Stony Brook University in New York. Her dissertation addressed Arnold Schoenberg's short opera Erwartung (Expectation), composed in 1909 on a libretto by Dr. Marie Pappenheim. Professor Keathley teaches courses in the History of Western Music, Music after 1900, Opera, and World Music for both music majors and non-majors, and freshman seminars in fine arts for Honors students, including Music and Society. She also teaches graduate seminars in the musical cultures of fin-de-siècle Vienna and Paris, and of Spain and Latin America, as well as in music, gender, and sexuality. She is a Faculty Fellow of the Lloyd International Honors College and has earned the UNCG Alumni Teaching Excellence Award. Keathley happily serves on the graduate committees of several bright and industrious graduate students; her students have earned distinctions for their scholarly accomplishments, including awards, scholarships, and publications.

Karen KilcupKaren Kilcup (Appointed until Fall 2015)

Linda Arnold Carlisle Distinguished Excellence Professor of Women's and Gender Studies at UNCG

Professor
Department of English

Core Faculty Member
Environmental Studies Program

klkilcup@uncg.edu
Webpage
336.334.4696
Ph.D Brandeis University

Karen L. Kilcup is a professor in the Department of English and a core faculty member of UNCG’s Environmental Studies Program. A past President of the Society for the Study of American Women Writers, she received a Distinguished Teacher award from the National Education Association and has taught at ten universities in the United States, Britain, and Switzerland. Since her arrival at UNCG seventeen years ago, Kilcup has contributed widely to WGS though her teaching, research, and service. Kilcup’s undergraduate degree from Wellesley College formed a prelude to her research interests in women and gender; her Ph.D. from Brandeis University advanced feminist literary theories concerning gendered voicing in American poetry. The author or editor of eleven books, she has also published four dozen articles or book chapters, the majority focused on women and gender. Her most recent work includes Fallen Forests: Emotion, Embodiment, and Ethics in American Women’s Environmental Writing, 1781-1924, for which she received a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship. Fallen Forests contributes to conversations in American women’s writing, ecofeminism, ecocriticism, and feminist rhetoric, expanding the literary, historical, and theoretical grounds for some of today’s most pressing environmental debates. Unlike previous ecocritical works, Fallen Forests considers outsider texts by African American, Native American, Mexican American, working-class, and non-Protestant women. Kilcup’s current project, "Stronger, Truer, Bolder”: American Children’s Writing, Nature, and the Environment, will extend Fallen Forests’ investigation, examining particularly how nineteenth-century women writers and journal editors collaborated in projects that advanced children’s (and parents’) environmental literacy and ethical action, and how their work continues today. This volume forms the core of her Carlisle professor project, “Engendering Environmental Ethics,” which will highlight how women have contributed powerfully to projects of environmental literacy and advocacy for socially progressive causes that include interspecies equity and environmental justice for the poor, immigrants, and people of color.

KruegerDerek Krueger (Appointed through Spring 2020)

Professor
Department of Religious Studies

kruegerd@uncg.edu
Webpage
336.334.5762
Ph.D Princeton University

Derek Krueger is the Joe Rosenthal Excellence Professor of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He received his AB from Amherst College in 1985 and his PhD from Princeton University in 1991. He has taught at UNCG since then, and served as Department Head from 2004 to 2010. He teaches courses on ancient, medieval, and Byzantine Christianity, and on religion and gender. He is the author of three books: Symeon the Holy Fool: Leontius's Life and the Late Antique City (University of California Press, 1996); and Writing and Holiness: The Practice of Authorship in the Early Christian East (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2004); and Liturgical Subjects: Christian Ritual, Biblical Narrative, and the Formation of the Self in Byzantium (forthcoming); and is the editor of Byzantine Christianity, the third volume in the series A People's History of Christianity (Fortress Press, 2006). Current projects include a book that explores how the culture of monasticism in Byzantium produced ideas about masculinity, gender, sexuality, and friendship.

lisa levenstein headshot croppedLisa Levenstein (Appointed through Spring 2020)

Associate Professor
Department of History

levenstein@uncg.edu
Webpage
336.256.0472
Ph.D University of Wisconson - Madison

Lisa Levenstein is Associate Professor of History. She is the author of A Movement Without Marches: African American Women and the Politics of Poverty in Postwar Philadelphia (UNC Press, 2009), which was co-winner of the Kenneth Jackson Book Award from the Urban History Association and received an Honorable Mention for the Frederick Jackson Turner Award from the Organization of American Historians. Levenstein has published award-winning articles in Feminist Studies and the Journal of Women’s History and recently co-authored, “The Big Tent of U.S. Women’s and Gender History: A State of the Field,” Journal of American History (December 2012). She has received several grants to support her two current projects on the displaced homemakers campaign of the 1970s and the Beijing Women’s Conference of 1995.

McFaddenCybelle McFadden (Appointed until Spring 2021)

Associate Professor
Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures

cmwilken@uncg.edu
Webpage
336.334.3335
CV
Ph.D Duke University

Cybelle H. McFadden is Assistant Professor of French and is also a member of the Women's and Gender Studies Program faculty at UNC-Greensboro. She received her PhD from Duke University. She has published articles on Monique Wittig and Sophie Calle and co-edited a volume of essays, Francophone Women: Between Visibility and Invisibility (2010). Her article, "Reflected Reflexivity in Jane B. par Agnès V." appeared in Quarterly Review of Film and Video (2011). Her book, Gendered Frames and Embodied Cameras: Varda, Akerman, Calle, Cabrera and Maïwenn, will be published by Fairleigh Dickinson University Press in 2014. Her next book project will focus on Franco-Arab cinema. Her teaching and research interests include: 20th/21st century French women's film and literature; feminist theory; contemporary French and Francophone film, video, visual art, and literature; French and Francophone cultures; and film theory.

schultheisAlexandra Schultheis Moore (Appointed through Spring 2020)

Associate Professor
Department of English

awschult@uncg.edu
Webpage
336.334.4691
CV
PhD University of Rochester

Moore works in postcolonial studies and on human rights in literature and film. She is the author of Regenerative Fictions: Postcolonialism, Psychoanalysis, and the Nation as Family (2004) as well as numerous book chapters and essays, and co-editor, with Elizabeth Swanson Goldberg, of Theoretical Perspectives on Human Rights and Literature (2012). They are also co-editing Doubling the Voice: Human Rights Workers and Survivors Address Torture (forthcoming) and Teaching Human Rights in Literary and Cultural Studies (under final review). Moore is currently completing a monograph on human rights as a mode of framing and reception in contemporary world literature. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on human rights; literature and globalization; postcolonial literature, film and theory; and postcolonial women's writing.

Noelle Morrissette bookNoelle Morrissette (Appointed until Fall 2017)

Associate Professor
Department of English

namorris@uncg.edu
Webpage
336.334.5311
CV
Ph.D Yale University

Noelle Morrissette writes about African American narrative, poetics, and expressive culture. Her monograph, James Weldon Johnson’s Modern Soundscapes (University of Iowa Press, 2013) investigates how the author’s literary representations of the extremes of sonic experience—functioning either as cultural violence or creative force—draw attention to the mutual contingencies and the interdependence of American and African American cultures. Her new book project, “Anne Spencer: Letters and Legacy,” for which she received the 2013-2014 Linda Arnold Carlisle Research Award, positions poet Anne Spencer at the center of the New Negro Renaissance of the 1920s, specifically arguing for an inclusive model of modernism that embraces women’s writing as central to the period’s aesthetics and politics. Morrissette teaches courses about modern and contemporary African American literary and popular culture that address violence and the modern self, inclusive of race, gender, and sexuality, and ranging from the “New Negro” era to “Post-Blackness” and “Post-Soul” studies.

myersNancy Myers (Appointed until Spring 2020)

Associate Professor
Department of English

nancymyers@uncg.edu
Webpage
336.334.3974
CV
PhD Texas Christian University

Nancy Myers earned her doctorate at Texas Christian University and is an Associate Professor of English at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG). She specializes in the history of rhetoric and composition pedagogy and served as 2010–2012 President of the Coalition of Women Scholars in the History of Rhetoric and Composition. She received the UNCG Alumni Teaching Excellence Award in 2002. Recent publications include essays in Political Women: Language and Leadership (Lexington 2013), Women's Oratorical Education (Routledge 2013), Rhetoric: Concord and Controversy (Waveland 2012), Silence and Listening as Rhetorical Arts (SIUP 2011), and Stories of Mentoring: Theory and Praxis (Palgrave 2008).

Loreen Olson headshotLoreen Olson (Appointed until Spring 2021)

Associate Professor
Department of Communication Studies
lnolson@uncg.edu
Webpage
336.256.5297
Ph.D University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Loreen Olson earned her Ph.D. from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She was a member of faculty at the University of Minnesota, Morris, Cleveland State University, and the University of Missouri before joining the UNCG community. Currently, she serves as the Director of the Program to Advance Community Responses to Violence Against Women and the Violence Prevention Network of Guilford County in the Center for Women’s Health and Wellness here at UNCG. Her research addresses communication issues related to gender, family, intimate partner violence, the dark side of close relationships, the communication of deviance, and the luring
communication of child sexual predators. Currently, she and her colleagues are examining the relationships between intimate partner violence and traumatic brain injury and polyvictimization and teen parenting. Here at UNCG, Olson teaches gender communication classes cross-listed with WGS in addition to other courses on family communication, communication theory, and the dark side of relational communication. Olson is a past chair of the Family Communication Division of the National Communication Association and editor of the Journal of Family Communication. She also co-authored the book entitled, The Dark Side of Family Communication and is currently co-editing, with her partner Dr. Mark Fine, a follow-up book entitled Examining the Darkness of Family Communication: The Harmful, the Morally Suspect, and the Socially Inappropriate.

AnneParsonsAnne Parsons (Appointed until Fall 2017)

Assistant Professor
Department of History

aeparson@uncg.edu
Webpage
336.334.5992
Ph.D University of Illinois at Chicago

Anne Parsons is an Assistant Professor in the Department of History and teaches in its Museum Studies Program. She received her MA in public history at New York University and her PhD at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Her current book project studies the politics of confinement, focusing in particular on the closure of mental hospitals in late twentieth America and its interaction with the rise of imprisonment. She served on the curatorial team of "Out in Chicago," an award-winning exhibition at the Chicago History Museum, and co-authored "When the Erotic Becomes Illicit: Displaying Queer History at a Mainstream Museum," Radical History Review (Spring 2012).

Susanne_Rinner[1]Susanne Rinner (Appointed through Spring 2020)

Associate Professor of German Studies
Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

s_rinner@uncg.edu
Webpage
336.256.0275
Ph.D Georgetown University

Dr. Rinner is originally from Speyer, a small, yet historically significant town located in the south of Germany. After an apprenticeship at Brockhaus & Duden, publisher of the respected German dictionary Duden and the leading German encyclopedia, she began her studies in philosophy, literature, and law at the Freie Universität in Berlin. Experiencing feelings of Wanderlust, she continued her graduate studies in the US. After teaching at Allegheny College, Georgetown University, and George Washington University, she joined the faculty at UNCG in 2007. With a focus on twentieth century and contemporary German literature, film and culture, her interdisciplinary research interests include cultural memory and social movements. Dr. Rinner is also interested in modern language pedagogy and curriculum development, and she enjoys working closely with students in and outside the classroom. With her scholarship and teaching, she contributes to the mission of the liberal arts in higher education.

RogersEugene Rogers (Appointed through Spring 2020)

Professor
Department of Religious Studies

efrogers@uncg.edu
Webpage
336.334.5762
Ph.D Yale University

Educated at Princeton, Tübingen, Rome, and Yale, Rogers taught at Yale College and Divinity School, Shaw University Divinity School, St. Anselm College, and, from 1993 to 2005, at the University of Virginia, where for several years he chaired the Program in Theology, Ethics, and Culture. All eight of his finished Ph.D. students have had full-time employment in colleges or universities, six tenure-track. In 2002-03, he was the Eli Lilly Visiting Associate Professor of Christian Thought and Practice in the Religion Department at Princeton University. He has held fellowships or residencies from the Fulbright Commission, the Mellon Foundation, the National Humanities Center, the Lilly Foundation, the Center of Theological Inquiry at Princeton Seminary, the Center for the Study of Religion at Princeton University, Tantur Ecumenical Research Institute in Jerusalem, and the Templeton Foundation. He is author or editor of six books and some thirty-five articles and translations. His current project is called The Analogy of Blood. He joined the UNCG faculty in 2005.

cathryneSchmitzCathryne Schmitz (Appointed until Spring 2020)

Professor
Department of Social Work

clschmit@uncg.edu
Webpage
336.334.9843
Ph.D Ohio State University

Cathryne L. Schmitz (MSW, Ph.D.), Professor and Director, Program in Conflict and Peace Studies and Professor, Department of Social Work, UNC-Greensboro is an affiliate faculty in Women and Gender Studies and a research fellow with the Center for New North Carolinians. She is engaged in global education and knowledge building, and is actively engaged with the Newcomers School. Her scholarship focuses on organizational and community change, privilege/oppression, critical multiculturalism, leadership, interdisciplinary education, global engagement, and environmental sustainability. She has numerous publications and is a co-author of Critical Multicultural Social Work.

Paige-SmithPaige Hall Smith (Appointed through Spring 2020)

Associate Professor
Public Health Education, Director of The Center for Women's Health and Wellness

paige_smith@uncg.edu
Webpage
336.334.5520
CV
Ph.D University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Paige Hall Smith, PhD, MSPH is associate professor of Public Health Education and Director of the Center for Women's Health and Wellness. She received her master's and doctorate from the School of Public Health at UNC Chapel Hill. For the first part of her research career Dr.Smith focused attention on understanding and preventing violence against women. She currently participates in partnerships at the national, state and local levels that seek to prevent and respond to gender-based violence.In 2004, with support from the Linda Arnold Carlisle Professorship, she expanded her work to focus on examining the intersections between breastfeeding, motherhood, work, gender and feminism. This research lead to the development of the Breastfeeding and Feminism Symposium Series, an international symposium dedicated to lifting up scholarship and practice that illuminates the connections between breastfeeding and gender (in) equality. This work naturally extends to helping to secure full rights, equity and justice for women for their full reproductive and productive capabilities.She is currently the Co-Director of the Gender Working Group of the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action, coordinator of the UNCG Breastfeeding Committee and is co-editor of a book published by Rutgers University Press called Beyond Health, Beyond Choice: Breastfeeding Constraints and Realities. This book emerged from scholarship presented at the 5th Breastfeeding and Feminism Symposium.

AmyVetter200Amy Vetter (Appointed through Spring 2020)

Associate Professor
Department of Teacher Education and Higher Education, School of Education

amvetter@uncg.edu
336.334.9876
Webpage
CV
Ph.D University of Texas at Austin

Amy Vetter is an associate professor in the Teacher Education and Higher Education Department, where she teaches undergraduate courses in teaching practices and curriculum of English and graduate courses in youth literacies, gender and education, and teacher research. Her areas of research interest are literacy and identity, classroom interactions, and teacher research. Since her arrival at UNCG, she has published articles in English Education, Journal of Literacy Research, English Journal, Qualitative Research in Education, Teacher Education Quarterly, Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, Changing English, and The Urban Review. She presents regularly at the National Conference for Teachers of English and Literacy Research Association Conference. Before her job in higher education, she taught all levels of tenth and twelfth grade English in Austin, Texas. She co-directs a young writers' camp in the summer and co-facilitates the Triad Teacher Researcher Group in various schools across the county. In her free time, she enjoys running, cycling, yoga and traveling to the mountains.

Amy-VinesAmy Vines (Appointed until Spring 2021)

Associate Professor
Department of English

anvines@uncg.edu
336.334.9876
CV
Ph.D Brown University

Amy Vines got her Ph.D. at Brown University in 2006 and has been at UNCG since 2007. She specializes in the literature and culture of fourteenth- and fifteenth-century England, with concentrations in women's readership, textual studies, patronage, and medieval romance. She teaches courses in medieval literature, history of the English language, and early women writers. Her graduate courses include Writing by and For Medieval Women, On the Margins of the Medieval: The Outcast in Middle English Literature, and Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.

amy-williamsenAmy Williamsen (Appointed until Fall 2017)

Department Head
Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures

arwill25@uncg.edu
Webpage
336.334.4689
Ph.D University of Southern California

Currently most of my energy is devoted to furthering our departmental mission to promote cultural diversity and international awareness at UNCG (and beyond) by "Discovering ourselves+others through explorations in languages, literatures, and cultures."

Affiliate Faculty

Affiliate faculty are those with an interest in issues of women, gender, sexuality and related topics and frequently teach classes that carry the WGS marker. These affiliated faculty do not participate in decision-making, though they may choose to serve on committees, or be involved in the program in other ways. Faculty may serve as cross-appointed for a time, then step back to affiliate status to make time for other commitments, or visa versa. If you are interested in becoming an affiliate faculty member, please e-mail the current director and program administrator, or wgs@uncg.edu.

A list of our Affiliate faculty members can be found here.

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